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5 in Five Criminal Intelligence Related Articles

 


May 8, 2017

 
Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice; Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative; Five in 5—Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council

The Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council’s (CICC) Five in 5 is a snapshot of law enforcement and criminal intelligence-related articles, resources, and research that may be of interest to CICC members and partners working to improve the nation’s ability to develop and share criminal intelligence. 

The CICC’s mission—to advocate for and support state, local, and tribal law enforcement and homeland security agencies and personnel in their efforts to develop and share criminal intelligence for the promotion of public safety and the security of our nation—is important, contemporary, and essential.  Five in 5 is provided for your information and awareness as an effort to assist the criminal intelligence community in understanding trends, training, and activities that may impact law enforcement and criminal intelligence.  You are encouraged to share this e-mail with your association members, colleagues, department/organization personnel, and others, as appropriate. Please contact cicc@iir.com to submit an article for consideration in the CICC’s Five in 5.

 
 
     
 
 
1. Fusion Centers

Cyber Shield 17 Highlights the Importance of Fusion Centers

Exercise Cyber Shield 17, which was recently held at Camp Williams, south of Salt Lake City, Utah, was an Army National Guard defensive cyberspace operations exercise.  The exercise included approximately 800 members of the Army National Guard, Air National Guard, and Army Reserve and representatives of state and federal government agencies, industry partners, and academia. The purpose of the exercise was to provide a collective training event to evaluate cyber operations and set the conditions for team validation.  Included in the participants was a Fusion Cell, a group of fusion center members from around the country.  The exercise prepared first responders for better collaboration, because the multiagency diversity at Cyber Shield reflected the diversity of professionals who integrate to defend against a cyberattack.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
2. Opioid Epidemic

Naloxone-Resistant Fentanyl Makes Its Way to Western Pennsylvania

A strain of fentanyl that is resistant to naloxone, the anti-overdose drug, has made its way to western Pennsylvania. The drug, acrylfentanyl, is hundreds of times more powerful than morphine and is already causing overdose deaths.  Unlike fentanyl and carfentanil, which have legitimate medical purposes for humans and animals respectively, acrylfentanyl serves no legitimate purpose and is therefore a Schedule I drug.  According to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), it is still unclear just how resistant acrylfentanyl is to naloxone and why it is resistant.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
3. Facial Recognition

The Perpetual Line-Up Report

The Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown Law has released a report based on a year-long investigation of over 100 records requests to police departments around the country.  The report provides a comprehensive survey of law enforcement face recognition and the risks that it poses to privacy, civil rights, and civil liberties and includes key findings and recommendations.  In addition, the specific findings for 25 local and state law enforcement agencies are available on a Face Recognition Scorecard, which evaluates these agencies’ impact on privacy, civil liberties, civil rights, transparency, and accountability.

Perpetual Line-Up Report

 
 
     
 
 
4. Countering Violent Extremism

GAO Report—Countering Violent Extremism: Actions Needed to Define Strategy and Assess Progress of Federal Efforts

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) recently released the report Countering Violent Extremism: Actions Needed to Define Strategy and Assess Progress of Federal Efforts.  According to the report, the federal government has been working to counter violent extremism (CVE) online and offline, but it has no means of measuring whether its overall effort is actually helping.  Auditors checked the status of 44 tasks to address CVE domestically outlined in a 2011 Strategic Implementation Plan.  The GAO found that the government had implemented nearly half of those activities.  As of December 2016, there had been no comprehensive assessment of the federal government’s CVE efforts’ effectiveness.  The GAO recommended that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary and the U.S. Attorney General direct the CVE Task Force to develop a strategy with measurable outcomes for CVE activities and establish and implement a process to assess overall progress in CVE, including its effectiveness.  DHS and the U.S. Department of Justice both agreed with the recommendations.  Read More

GAO Report

 
 
     
 
 
5. Cybersecurity

Digital Spring Cleaning

The Multi-State Information Sharing and Analysis Center (MS-ISAC) April Newsletter contains several tips for individuals to use to refresh, renew, and reinvigorate their cyber life.  By taking a few minutes to follow the recommendations in the newsletter, you can ensure that your data and devices are much safer.

MS-ISAC Newsletter

 

Additional cyber-related resources are available on the Law Enforcement Cyber Center website.


April 24, 2017

 
Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice; Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative; Five in 5—Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council

The Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council’s (CICC) Five in 5 is a snapshot of law enforcement and criminal intelligence-related articles, resources, and research that may be of interest to CICC members and partners working to improve the nation’s ability to develop and share criminal intelligence. 

The CICC’s mission—to advocate for and support state, local, and tribal law enforcement and homeland security agencies and personnel in their efforts to develop and share criminal intelligence for the promotion of public safety and the security of our nation—is important, contemporary, and essential.  Five in 5 is provided for your information and awareness as an effort to assist the criminal intelligence community in understanding trends, training, and activities that may impact law enforcement and criminal intelligence.  You are encouraged to share this e-mail with your association members, colleagues, department/organization personnel, and others, as appropriate. Please contact cicc@iir.com to submit an article for consideration in the CICC’s Five in 5.

 
 
     
 
 
1. Violence Reduction

Savannah Officials: Homicide Lull, Drop in Crime is Progress

The latest Savannah-Chatham, Georgia, Metropolitan Police Department (SCMPD) crime numbers are showing a gradual droop in violent crime and other offenses.  The SCMPD’s answer to the rise in violent crime is its End Gun Violence: Step Forward initiative.  The initiative is a program that utilizes both local and federal resources to crack down on group and gang violence with a focus on neighborhood outreach. It targets the most violent members of groups and gangs — the ones responsible for a majority of the shootings and homicides in the city.  End Gun Violence uses intelligence-led policing to hunt down the small group of individuals who commit the majority of violent crime.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
2. Use of Force

LAPD Revises Use-of-Force Policy to Reduce Police Shootings

On April 18, the Los Angeles, California, Police Commission adopted a revised use-of-force policy that calls on officers to avoid resorting to deadly force by de-escalating the tension in interactions with the public.  The policy has the backing of the union representing the Los Angeles Police Department’s more than 8,000 rank-and-file officers.  LAPD officials said that with the recent focus on de-escalation, and now the adoption of the revised policy and training programs, the focus is on minimizing the number of police shootings and the use of deadly force.  Read More

Revised Use-of-Force Policy

 
 
     
 
 
3. Analysis

Analyst Professional Development Road Map Resource

The CICC developed the resource Analyst Professional Development Road Map to support law enforcement leadership as they continue to hire and train analysts.  The purpose of the road map is to create a sustainable, professional career path for analysts operating within state, local, tribal, and territorial organizations. This path focuses on the development and enhancement of analytic-related knowledge, skills, and abilities over three overarching analyst levels (basic, intermediate, and advanced) and the training recommended for achieving each level. In the context of this document, the term “analyst” typically refers to an individual serving in an intelligence analyst position; however, other analysts, including crime analysts, are encouraged to use this guidance as appropriate.

Download Resource
 

 
 
     
 
 
4. First Amendment Training and Resources

First Amendment Law Enforcement Resources and Online Training Available

The CICC has developed several documents and training videos for law enforcement over the past several years that provide guidance and recommendations in understanding their roles and responsibilities in First Amendment-protected events, including:

 
 
     
 
 
5. Cybersecurity

Shodan—Search Engine for Internet-Connected Devices

The Shodan search engine enables users to discover Internet-connected devices, also known as the Internet of Things (IoT), where they are located, and who is using them.  Users can also keep track of all the computers on their network that are directly accessible from the Internet to understand their digital footprint.  The tool also includes power plants, Smart TVs, refrigerators, and more devices.

Additional information is available at https://www.shodan.io.

Additional cyber-related resources are available on the Law Enforcement Cyber Center Web site.

 

April 17, 2017

 
Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice; Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative; Five in 5—Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council

The Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council’s (CICC) Five in 5 is a snapshot of law enforcement and criminal intelligence-related articles, resources, and research that may be of interest to CICC members and partners working to improve the nation’s ability to develop and share criminal intelligence. 

The CICC’s mission—to advocate for and support state, local, and tribal law enforcement and homeland security agencies and personnel in their efforts to develop and share criminal intelligence for the promotion of public safety and the security of our nation—is important, contemporary, and essential.  Five in 5 is provided for your information and awareness as an effort to assist the criminal intelligence community in understanding trends, training, and activities that may impact law enforcement and criminal intelligence.  You are encouraged to share this e-mail with your association members, colleagues, department/organization personnel, and others, as appropriate. Please contact cicc@iir.com to submit an article for consideration in the CICC’s Five in 5.

 
 
     
 
 
1. Webinar

VALOR Webinar:  Defusing Difficult Encounters—April 19, 2017 at 2:30 p.m. EDT

Valor will hold a no-cost Defusing Difficult Encounters Webinar on April 19, 2017, at 2:30 p.m. (EDT), geared toward all state, local, and tribal sworn law enforcement professionals.  The Webinar is part of the Spotlight on Safety, which is a themed, multidimensional outreach plan designed to promote officer safety awareness and wellness.  The goal of this Webinar is to enhance law enforcement officers’ abilities to evaluate situations that they may encounter, apply general defusing principles and methods, and make appropriate tactical decisions to resolve fluid, dynamic, and uncertain situations.  Resources, materials, and links are provided during the Webinar.  This Webinar presentation is approximately 30 minutes in length, and there will be a 15-minute question-and-answer session following the presentation.

Additional Information and Webinar Registration

A VALOR for Blue account is necessary to take the training.  Sworn law enforcement officers can register online.

Additional VALOR Training

 
 
     
 
 
2. Prescription Drugs

DEA’s Next Prescription Drug Take Back Day to be Held April 29

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and its law enforcement partners will hold the 13th National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on Saturday, April 29, at thousands of collection sites across America.  This free and anonymous event gives people the opportunity to rid their homes of potentially dangerous expired or unused medications, including painkillers, sedatives, tranquilizers, and stimulants.  Drug abuse in the U.S. is alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs.  Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends and the customary methods for disposing of unused medicines—flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash—pose potential safety and health hazards.  Last October, Americans turned in over 730,000 pounds of prescription drugs.  To find a collection site near you, enter your zip code or call 1-800-882-9539.  Some federal agencies are collecting unwanted medications on Wednesday, April 26, so employees are urged to check with their agency’s Human Resources Department.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
3. Cybersecurity

Marquette University Establishes Milwaukee Area’s First Cyber Security Center

As cyber security concerns rise nationally, Marquette University, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, has established the Center for Cyber Security Awareness and Cyber Defense, which will focus on cyber security education, research, and community involvement.  The center will be affiliated with the Helen Way Klingler College of Arts and Sciences and the university's computer science department, and it will help prepare Marquette students for cyber security professions, provide education on topics related to cyber security, and host events, such as an upcoming April 28 symposium on the ethics of big data.  A searchable directory of cybercrime labs and resources nationwide is available on the Law Enforcement Cyber Center Website.  Read More

 

 
 
     
 
 
4. Information Sharing

Information Sharing and the Post-9/11 Legislative Landscape

After 16 years of unprecedented legal, policy, and technological advancement, substantial efforts continue to untangle information sharing challenges and better secure the Homeland.  This second brief in a four part series on homeland security information sharing briefly looks back at the pre-9/11 landscape and some of the key legislation that continues to help successfully transform the Homeland Security Community from a “need to know” to a “need to share” environment.  The article also outlines the post-9/11 landscape, including transforming government, partnerships, the environment, and technology, and stresses that, as the threat environment changes, technology advances, and organizations continue to battle old cultural norms, new challenges arise and our laws and policies must keep up to improve information sharing and maintain privacy and civil liberty protections.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
5. Cybersecurity

Law Enforcement Cyber Alerts

Periodically, the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C) focuses on a smartphone application and provides an overview, available features, importance to law enforcement, investigative information, etc.  The alerts also include information NW3C retrieved from the application during tests with Apple iOS and Android devices.

View Alerts

Additional cyber-related resources are available on the Law Enforcement Cyber Center Web site.


April 7, 2017

 
Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice; Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative; Five in 5—Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council

The Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council’s (CICC) Five in 5 is a snapshot of law enforcement and criminal intelligence-related articles, resources, and research that may be of interest to CICC members and partners working to improve the nation’s ability to develop and share criminal intelligence. 

The CICC’s mission—to advocate for and support state, local, and tribal law enforcement and homeland security agencies and personnel in their efforts to develop and share criminal intelligence for the promotion of public safety and the security of our nation—is important, contemporary, and essential.  Five in 5 is provided for your information and awareness as an effort to assist the criminal intelligence community in understanding trends, training, and activities that may impact law enforcement and criminal intelligence.  You are encouraged to share this e-mail with your association members, colleagues, department/organization personnel, and others, as appropriate. Please contact cicc@iir.com to submit an article for consideration in the CICC’s Five in 5.

 
 
     
 
 
1. Technology

Law Enforcement Utilizing Crowdsourcing Tech to Fight Child Pornography

During a panel discussion at the Southern Region meeting of the National Association of Attorneys General, Virginia Attorney General Mark R. Herring and his partners in the Campaign for Child Rescue presented new technologies that utilize image-analyzing software and a crowdsourcing platform to fight child pornography.  Significant investments in new technology have been made so that rather than each state or law enforcement agency working child exploitation investigations on their own, they can be linked and multiple investigations can be conducted at the same time.  The project is already in use in Virginia and four other states, and AG Herring and his collaborators hope more states will adopt the technology to grow the network and aid law enforcement efforts to capture child predators.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
2. Use of Force

APA Peace Officer Use of Force Project

The Association of Prosecuting Attorneys (APA), a national organization of elected and appointed prosecutors and their deputies, worked over the past year to establish the Use of Force Project in direct response to the difficult and divisive issue of peace officer use of force incidents.  The 21st Century Principles of Prosecution report recommends innovative and promising practices for investigating use of force cases, ensuring the integrity of use of force prosecutions, and promoting equal justice and safer communities.  Read More

 

 
 
     
 
 
3. Information Sharing

Waze's Traffic Data Could Help Emergency Services Save Lives

Soon, Waze data will not only help drivers avoid accidents but help emergency responders identify them as they happen.  The Google-owned navigation service has partnered with the European Emergency Number Association (EENA) to anonymously share data that will help police, EMS, and fire services detect and respond to incidents in real time.  The process is simple: as soon as European users notify Waze about an accident, emergency services will receive a notification in their system.  Response teams can also call on Waze's real-time traffic data to plan the most effective route, especially if roads in the affected area are blocked.  Waze has announced a number of similar partnerships over the past couple of years through the Connected Citizens project, which includes several pilot cities, such as Boston, Rio de Janeiro, Barcelona, Jakarta, and Tel Aviv.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
4. Legal System

CourtHack 2.0 Hackathon—April 22–23, 2017, in New Brunswick, New Jersey

CourtHack 2.0, the premiere U.S. Justice System hackathon, will be held on April 22–23 in New Brunswick, New Jersey.  The brightest legal minds, technologists, entrepreneurs, and others will gather for an epic 30-hour hackathon to benefit the administration of justice.  Expert mentors, including judges, administrators, and CIOs, from across the country will lend their expertise to help ensure participants are building useful, relevant projects.  Participating teams will come together from a variety of sources: universities, not-for-profit development groups, industry, courts, and individuals gathering and forming teams on-site.  The cost is $10 per participant.  Teams will compete for sizeable cash and noncash prizes, invaluable mentorship opportunities, key meetings with industry decision makers, and a demo spot at a major court technology conference.

Additional Information and Registration

 
 
     
 
 
5. Cybersecurity

What the Public Knows About Cybersecurity

According to a recent Pew Research Center survey, many Americans are unclear about some key cybersecurity topics, terms, and concepts.  A majority of online adults can identify a strong password when they see one and recognize the dangers of using public Wi-Fi.  However, many struggle with more technical cybersecurity concepts, such as how to identify true two-factor authentication or determine whether a webpage they are using is encrypted.  The survey consisted of 13 questions designed to test Americans’ knowledge of a number of cybersecurity issues and terms.  Cybersecurity is a complicated and diverse subject, but these questions cover many of the general concepts and basic building blocks that cybersecurity experts stress are important for users to protect themselves online.  The report also includes an interactive 13-question quiz to test a user’s cybersecurity knowledge based on the national survey.  After completing the quiz, users can compare their scores with the general public and learn more about the terms and topics in each question.  Read More

Additional cyber-related resources are available on the Law Enforcement Cyber Center Web site.


March 10, 2017

 
Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice; Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative; Five in 5—Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council

The Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council’s (CICC) Five in 5 is a snapshot of law enforcement and criminal intelligence-related articles, resources, and research that may be of interest to CICC members and partners working to improve the nation’s ability to develop and share criminal intelligence. 

The CICC’s mission—to advocate for and support state, local, and tribal law enforcement and homeland security agencies and personnel in their efforts to develop and share criminal intelligence for the promotion of public safety and the security of our nation—is important, contemporary, and essential.  Five in 5 is provided for your information and awareness as an effort to assist the criminal intelligence community in understanding trends, training, and activities that may impact law enforcement and criminal intelligence.  You are encouraged to share this e-mail with your association members, colleagues, department/organization personnel, and others, as appropriate. Please contact cicc@iir.com to submit an article for consideration in the CICC’s Five in 5.

 
 
     
 
 
1. Training

VALOR Program Training Modules for Sworn Law Enforcement

The Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) VALOR Officer Safety Initiative was created in response to the startling increase in felonious assaults that have taken the lives of many law enforcement officers. VALOR provides all levels of law enforcement with tools to help prevent violence against law enforcement officers and to enhance officer safety, wellness, and resiliency.  The VALOR Program has released an improved eLearning environment geared toward law enforcement officers, titled VALOR for Blue eLearning.  It provides access to online training modules, roll calls, and Webinar recordings.  Examples of training modules include Mental Health and Wellness, Ambush Attacks, and Active Shooter Events. 

Access Online VALOR Training

A VALOR for Blue account is necessary to take the training.  Sworn law enforcement officers can register online.

 
 
     
 
 
2. Real Time Crime Center

Regional Police Intelligence Hub Opens in South Jersey

The New Jersey State Police officially opened the Real Time Crime Center-South at the end of February.  The center, located at Rowan College at Gloucester County, is a tactical facility where law enforcement agencies in southern New Jersey will work together to develop a regional perspective on criminal activity, officials explained.  The goal in this space is to connect South Jersey’s six counties, more than 100 police departments, and more than 4,000 officers with the tools to fight some of our biggest regional crime challenges.  The center is staffed with New Jersey State Police personnel and officers from various law enforcement entities around the region.  The Real Time Crime Center-South joins its northern counterpart in Newark and the state police Regional Operations Intelligence Center in Trenton.  “This is what I call closing the circuit on information sharing in the state of New Jersey,” Colonel Joseph R. Fuentes, superintendent of the New Jersey State Police, said of opening the south site.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
3. Use of Force

Use of Force Training Shows Participants Other Side of Blue Line

On March 4, approximately 40 men and women trained with officers from the Sarasota, Florida, Police Department (SPD) and got an inside look at what it is like to walk on their side of the blue line.  Officers played both instructors and actors as participants made traffic stops that went awry, searched for a burglary suspect in a simulated dark warehouse, and intervened on a violent domestic dispute.  The men and women were taught to identify threats and told to use their best judgment during situations—for example, when to use physical force or their fake firearms.  The SPD hopes the training will help dispel any misconceptions about police by giving the community a greater understanding of what they do and why.  It also hopes to create a similar version to take into schools for students.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
4. Technology

Search Earth With AI Eyes Via a Powerful New Satellite Image Tool

On March 7, a New Mexico startup that provides artificial intelligence (AI)-driven analysis of satellite images to governments, academics, and industry released a public demo of its GeoVisual Search, a new type of search engine that combines satellite images of Earth with machine learning on a massive scale.  Users can pick an object anywhere on Earth that can be seen from space, and the system returns a list of similar-looking objects and their locations on the planet.  GeoVisual Search operates on top of an intelligent machine-learning platform that can be trained and will improve over time.  This technology could potentially be used in various way by law enforcement, such as helping identify critical infrastructure and assets in an area.  Read More

Preview Tool

 
 
     
 
 
5. Cybersecurity

Most Hackers Can Access Systems and Steal Valuable Data Within 24 Hours: Nuix Black Report

The Nuix Black Report—the results of a confidential survey of 70 professional hackers and penetration testers at DEFCON, the world’s largest hacking and security conference—will overturn many conventional understandings and customs of the cybersecurity industry.  By examining the security landscape from the hacker’s perspective, the report has revealed results that are contrary to the conventional understanding of cybersecurity. For example:

  • Respondents said traditional countermeasures such as firewalls and antivirus almost never slowed them down, but endpoint security technologies were more effective at stopping attacks.
  • More than half of respondents changed their methodologies with every target, severely limiting the effectiveness of security defenses based on known files and attacks.
  • Around one-third of attackers said their target organizations never detected their activities.

Read More

Access Full Report

Additional cyber-related resources are available on the Law Enforcement Cyber Center Web site.


February 21, 2017

 
Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice; Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative; Five in 5—Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council

The Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council’s (CICC) Five in 5 is a snapshot of law enforcement and criminal intelligence-related articles, resources, and research that may be of interest to CICC members and partners working to improve the nation’s ability to develop and share criminal intelligence. 

The CICC’s mission—to advocate for and support state, local, and tribal law enforcement and homeland security agencies and personnel in their efforts to develop and share criminal intelligence for the promotion of public safety and the security of our nation—is important, contemporary, and essential.  Five in 5 is provided for your information and awareness as an effort to assist the criminal intelligence community in understanding trends, training, and activities that may impact law enforcement and criminal intelligence.  You are encouraged to share this e-mail with your association members, colleagues, department/organization personnel, and others, as appropriate. Please contact cicc@iir.com to submit an article for consideration in the CICC’s Five in 5.

 
 
     
 
 
1. Human Trafficking

Your Hotel Room Photos Could Help Catch Sex Traffickers

For investigators attempting to locate sex traffickers and their victims, online advertisements can contain critical clues.  The smallest of details in a hotel room could give away its location, but there are too many ads for law enforcement to scan each of them for clues.  A simple smartphone application called TraffickCam uses crowd-sourced snapshots of hotel rooms to help law enforcement locate victims and prosecute sex traffickers.  Travelers can turn on their phone's GPS location and upload photos of their hotel room from four different angles to TraffickCam's database.  The idea is that law enforcement agencies can then check advertisements featuring suspected trafficking victims in hotel rooms against TraffickCam's database of photos.  Since launching in June 2016, more than 150,000 hotels have been added to the database.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
2. Real Time Crime Center

Chattanooga Police Working on Intelligence Center to Track Crime in Real Time

The Chattanooga, Tennessee, City Council recently approved $750,000 in cameras, software, and video networking tools for the police department's Real Time Crime Center.  The council also approved a $40,000 mobile app that allows the police department to push notifications to citizens and for citizens to report criminal activity in real time.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
3. Intelligence Analysis

N-DEx Plays a Major Role in Uncovering a Multi-State Credit Card Fraud Ring

An intelligence analyst with the New York State Intelligence Center became aware of an “Attempt to Identify” bulletin from Spotsylvania, Virginia, in January 2015.  The bulletin pertained to a group of subjects who used cloned credit cards at a liquor store where two of the subjects presented New York identification cards.  The analyst identified one of the subjects, but there was only partial identifying information on the second subject.  After unsuccessfully searching local New York resources, the analyst searched the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI) National Data Exchange (N-DEx) System.  From the N-DEx System, the analyst learned that the unidentified subject had been involved in another incident in Virginia which revealed two more subjects.  The analyst continued to identify other incidents and connect subjects.  The analyst eventually uncovered a 16-person credit card fraud ring based in Far Rockaway, New York, and linked 32 incidents in eight states.  She compiled a 22-page packet detailing the subjects and a timeline of the incidents, and her efforts resulted in information sharing among 21 local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies.  Read More

 

 
 
     
 
 
4. Human Trafficking

U.S. Police Arrest Record 750 Suspects in Super Bowl Sex-Trafficking Stings

U.S. police have arrested at least 750 people in sex-trafficking sting operations timed to coincide with the Super Bowl, saying the top sporting event is a magnet for illicit sex.  More than 100 arrests were made in Houston, Texas, where the National Football League championship game took place on February 5, as sports fans flocked to the city.  There are no firm statistics on how much forced prostitution increases in the run-up to the Super Bowl, and experts are divided on the impact the event has on sex trafficking.  A 2011 report by the Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women found no evidence linking the two.  But a major 2016 study by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found that although past Super Bowls had drawn sex workers to host cities, other events, including industry conferences, were bigger potential magnets for sex-trafficking victims.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
5. Cybersecurity

It’s “Code Red” as Cybersecurity Pros Gather

Thousands of cybersecurity professionals recently attended the RSA Cybersecurity Conference in San Francisco, California.  The threat level is now Code Red.  Familiar threats, such as hacking by groups backed by governments, are not new, but they have become more severe in the last year.  There are new threats as well, such as the use of botnets to take down Internet service for an entire region.  Three topics especially dominated this year's conference:  (1) the threat nation-states pose as cyberattackers, (2) the threat from botnet and Internet of Things (IoT) devices, and (3) ransomware and other windows of opportunity for attacks.  Read More

Additional cyber-related resources are available on the Law Enforcement Cyber Center Web site.


February 6, 2017

 
Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice; Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative; Five in 5—Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council

The Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council’s (CICC) Five in 5 is a snapshot of law enforcement and criminal intelligence-related articles, resources, and research that may be of interest to CICC members and partners working to improve the nation’s ability to develop and share criminal intelligence. 

The CICC’s mission—to advocate for and support state, local, and tribal law enforcement and homeland security agencies and personnel in their efforts to develop and share criminal intelligence for the promotion of public safety and the security of our nation—is important, contemporary, and essential.  Five in 5 is provided for your information and awareness as an effort to assist the criminal intelligence community in understanding trends, training, and activities that may impact law enforcement and criminal intelligence.  You are encouraged to share this e-mail with your association members, colleagues, department/organization personnel, and others, as appropriate. Please contact cicc@iir.com to submit an article for consideration in the CICC’s Five in 5.

 
 
     
 
 
1. Policing

New Report: Providing Evidence-Based Recommendations to Combat Violent Crime

The Police Foundation and the Major Cities Chiefs Association recently released a new report, entitled Reducing Violent Crime in American Cities: An Opportunity to Lead.  The report provides more than 25 recommendations for the new Administration and Congress to strengthen federal-local partnerships and support local efforts to reduce violent crime.  The recommendations create an overarching strategy to address violence by prioritizing violent crime, holding federal partners accountable for local impacts, and enabling the kinds of partnerships that will create lasting solutions.

Download Executive Brief

Download Full Report

 
 
     
 
 
2. Crime Analysis

Center Arms Deputies With Data to Fight Crime

Personnel at the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office’s Criminal Intelligence Center in Dayton, Ohio, analyze data in almost real time to support area law enforcement, and the center is an invaluable resource to local departments.  For example, one local law enforcement agency relies on the center particularly on lengthy investigations that require detectives to put all the players together in complicated cases.  The center helps “put the pieces” together and saves investigators time.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
3. Narcotics

Increase in Heroin Trafficking Frustrating for Law Enforcement

Local law enforcement officers in and around Marietta, Ohio, are facing a problem of heroin and fentanyl use in their communities, as much of the nation is.  Agencies in the area track known drug users for months to link the larger network of heroin and fentanyl distribution together, but the rate and variable points of transaction make the fight a long war.  Law enforcement is seeing a significant increase in the number of people selling these drugs, as opposed to ten years ago when the dealers were known.  The Washington Morgan Noble Major Crimes Task Force works to combat the growing drug epidemic in the Mid-Ohio Valley.  The task force tracks tips, watches local users, and logs evidence from each drug raid with the hope of finding further links throughout the local network.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
4. Real-Time Crime Center

Virtual Eyes and Ears on the Street: An Inside Look at Wilmington’s New, High-Tech Crime Solving Center

The Wilmington, North Carolina, Police Department’s Situational Tactics and Intelligence Nexus Group (STING) Center is now in operation and helping solve crimes across the city.  The STING Center has helped provide up-to-the-minute information to officers in the field by utilizing live video feeds, as well as information from state, local, and federal law enforcement databases and social media, to help both combat and solve crimes in Wilmington.  The center will be continually evolving, both in staff and technology.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
5. Cybersecurity

Looking Forward: 2017's Top Threat Prediction

The Center for Internet Security (CIS) posted a Twitter poll asking respondents to choose which of the four listed threat areas would be the biggest cyberthreat in 2017.  The Internet of Things (IoT) took the top spot as biggest threat by a large margin.  Other threat areas include Data Dump Re-Use, Advanced Persistent Threat (APT), and Ransomware.  The article outlines some quick primers on why these are threats to everyday users and how you can work to protect yourself in the connected world.  Read More

Additional cyber-related resources are available on the Law Enforcement Cyber Center Web site.


January 30, 2017

 
 
Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice; Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative; Five in 5—Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council

The Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council’s (CICC) Five in 5 is a snapshot of law enforcement and criminal intelligence-related articles, resources, and research that may be of interest to CICC members and partners working to improve the nation’s ability to develop and share criminal intelligence. 

The CICC’s mission—to advocate for and support state, local, and tribal law enforcement and homeland security agencies and personnel in their efforts to develop and share criminal intelligence for the promotion of public safety and the security of our nation—is important, contemporary, and essential.  Five in 5 is provided for your information and awareness as an effort to assist the criminal intelligence community in understanding trends, training, and activities that may impact law enforcement and criminal intelligence.  You are encouraged to share this e-mail with your association members, colleagues, department/organization personnel, and others, as appropriate. Please contact cicc@iir.com to submit an article for consideration in the CICC’s Five in 5.

 
 
     
 
 
1. Analytic Seminars

2017 Specialized Analytic Seminar Series

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is pleased to announce the 2017 Specialized Analytic Seminar Series to provide dynamic and focused peer-to-peer analytic collaboration.  Participation in this program is targeted to state and major urban area fusion center personnel, as well as personnel from High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Investigative Support Centers, Regional Information Sharing Systems® (RISS) Centers, and major city/county intelligence units.  Each seminar addresses a specialized-threat topic area and the associated patterns, trends, skills, and resources necessary to effectively monitor and evaluate potential threats in the attendees’ areas of responsibility. 

The 2017 series includes the following sessions:

  • Fusion Liaison Officer (FLO) Coordinator Best Practices: March 29–30, 2017, Orlando, Florida
  • West Regional Jail/Correctional Intelligence: May 9–10, 2017, Los Angeles, California
  • East Regional Jail/Correctional Intelligence: July 19–20, 2017, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Geospatial/Geographic Information System (GIS): August 23–24, 2017, Bozeman, Montana
  • Cybersecurity: November 15–16, 2017, Frankfort, Kentucky

Interested attendees should register at http://dhs.anl.gov/analyticseminar.  Due to limitations on the number of attendees, participants are encouraged to register for all applicable sessions as soon as possible.

 
 
     
 
 
2. Information Sharing

Sensitive But Unclassified STAC Publishes Concept of Operations

On November 15, 2016, the Sensitive But Unclassified (SBU) Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) finalized a concept of operations (CONOP) document that articulates the common operating policies, processes, and procedures for a National Interoperable SBU Federation (the Federation).  The CONOPS is not a document chock full  of technical jargon; rather, it accurately, briefly, and concisely outlines the operating concepts necessary to connect the entire SBU landscape to drive successful implementation of SBU information sharing in Access, Discovery/Search, and Shared Services and recommends that three operating principles form the basis of ongoing Federation activity.  Read More

Download CONOP

 
 
     
 
 
3. Use of Force

Leading Law Enforcement Organizations Release National Consensus Policy on Use of Force

Eleven leading law enforcement leadership and labor organizations in the United States have worked to develop a National Consensus Policy on Use of Force, which was recently released.  This consensus policy takes into account and reflects the broad views and experience of the field—ranging from a line officer to an executive.  The policy adopted by these organizations reflects the best thinking of all consensus organizations and is solely intended to serve as a template for law enforcement agencies to compare and enhance their existing policies.  The resource highlights general provisions for use of force, de-escalation, use of less lethal force, use of deadly force, and training.  Read More

Download Resource

 
 
     
 
 
4. Technology

Tech Companies Create Shared Database to Track, Remove “Violent Terrorist Imagery”

Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter and YouTube say they are creating a database to keep track of terrorist recruitment videos and other terror-related images that have been removed from their services.  The collaboration will allow companies to cross-reference videos and pictures that show up on their services with a database of those that have already been removed from other services.  For example, if a video glorifying violence in the name of the Islamic State has been removed from Twitter, it will be assigned a unique "fingerprint" that will be stored in the database. If the same video shows up on Facebook, Facebook will be able to match the video and, if it chooses, to remove it.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
5. Cybersecurity

Hacktivists Increasingly Target Local and State Government Computers

“Hacktivism” is a blend of hacking and activism for a political or social cause, and state and local governments are increasingly finding themselves targets.  Unlike cyber criminals who hack into computer networks to steal data for money, most hacktivists are not doing it for profit.  They are individuals or groups of hackers who band together and see themselves as fighting injustice.  There has been a significant growth in the number and severity of hacktivist attacks on state and local governments in the past five years.  Cybersecurity experts warn that state and local governments need to prepare to fight all sorts of online attacks, including those by cyber activists.  One recommendation is that if government computer systems are not equipped to handle hacktivist attacks, officials should work with their Internet providers to install programs that help block illegitimate Web traffic.  Read More

Additional cyber-related resources are available on the Law Enforcement Cyber Center Web site.


January 20, 2017

 

 
 
 
Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice; Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative; Five in 5—Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council

The Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council’s (CICC) Five in 5 is a snapshot of law enforcement and criminal intelligence-related articles, resources, and research that may be of interest to CICC members and partners working to improve the nation’s ability to develop and share criminal intelligence. 

The CICC’s mission—to advocate for and support state, local, and tribal law enforcement and homeland security agencies and personnel in their efforts to develop and share criminal intelligence for the promotion of public safety and the security of our nation—is important, contemporary, and essential.  Five in 5 is provided for your information and awareness as an effort to assist the criminal intelligence community in understanding trends, training, and activities that may impact law enforcement and criminal intelligence.  You are encouraged to share this e-mail with your association members, colleagues, department/organization personnel, and others, as appropriate. Please contact cicc@iir.com to submit an article for consideration in the CICC’s Five in 5.

 
 
     
 
 
1. Going Dark

Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch Announces the Justice Department’s National Strategy to Combat Human Trafficking

As a result of the fundamental shift in communications services and technologies, law enforcement investigators are increasingly unable to obtain needed evidence and intelligence, despite having the legal authority to do so.  In order to better define and quantify the “Going Dark” problem, the following law enforcement associations have agreed to work together on an effort to collect quantitative and qualitative data.

  • Major Cities Chiefs Association
  • Association of State Criminal Investigative Agencies
  • Major County Sheriffs’ Association
  • International Association of Chiefs of Police
  • Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council
  • National Sheriffs’ Association
  • National District Attorneys Association
  • National Narcotics Officers’ Associations Coalition
  • Association of Prosecuting Attorneys

Statistics and case examples are an important part of the ongoing public policy process, and critical to inform public officials, citizens, and members of the media.  It is essential to account for barriers to access investigative data: devices that cannot be accessed, obstacles to obtaining stored communications information with legal process, and challenges relating to data encryption.

An agreed upon central repository for data and case examples has been established at the National Domestic Communications Assistance Center (NDCAC).  Data and case examples can be submitted through the NDCAC online portal or emailed to the address provided.  Interested law enforcement agencies should contact the NDCAC to obtain access to the portal or obtain data entry spreadsheets to submit information via e-mail. 

NDCAC Technical Resource Group
Phone:  (855) 306-3222
E-mail:  askndcac@ic.fbi.gov

 
 
     
 
 
2. Technology

Report Released:  Future-Proofing Justice:  Building a Research Agenda to Address the Effects of Technological Change on the Protection of Constitutional Rights

New technologies have changed the types of data that are routinely collected about citizens on a daily basis.  As technology changes, new portable and connected devices have the potential to gather even more information.  Such data have great potential utility in criminal justice proceedings, and they are already being used in case preparations, plea negotiations, and trials. But the broad expansion of technological capability also has the potential to stress approaches for ensuring that individuals' constitutional rights are protected through legal processes.  In an effort to consider those implications, a panel of legal scholars and individuals from the civil liberties community were convened to identify research and other needs to prepare the U.S. legal system both for technologies we are seeing today and for technologies we are likely to see in the future.  Read More

Download Report

 
 
     
 
 
3. Cybersecurity

State-Owned Cyberwarfare Training Facility Planned for Georgia

Georgia Governor Nathan Deal announced plans for a new state-owned training center that is designed to teach students and educators how to combat hacking and other forms of cyberwarfare.  The Georgia Cyber Innovation and Training Center is to be built near the U.S. Army’s Cyber Command headquarters in Augusta and will include a “cyber range,” where cyberwarfare training and technology development unfolds.  The center is being developed with the Department of Defense and the National Security Agency and once completed.  The center will be able to collaborate with about seven different universities and private industries to provide training on the latest computer skills and techniques, and offer courses in cloud security training, cyber analysis certification, and disaster recovery workshops.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
4. Policing

Emerging Issues for Improving the Law Enforcement Response to Domestic and Sexual Violence:  Three New Reports Now Available

The U.S. Department of Justice’s (DOJ) Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) recently released three reports addressing emerging issues related to improving the law enforcement response to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.  The documents reflect input from diverse stakeholders and were developed in conjunction with OVW’s national technical assistance providers. 

Read More

 
 
     
 
 
5. Cybersecurity

Republican Bill Aims to Bolster U.S. Attack Attribution Capabilities

New cybersecurity legislation aims to bolster the U.S. government’s attribution capabilities as well as a foster an increasingly close relationship between government, industry and academia.  The Rapid Innovation Act of 2017, co-sponsored by Texas Republican Reps. John Ratcliffe and Michael McCaul, would make innovation in cybersecurity a responsibility of the Department of Homeland Security’s undersecretary for science and technology.  The bill, which emerged from the Homeland Security Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, recently passed the House and is now headed to the Senate.  Read More

Additional cyber-related resources are available on the Law Enforcement Cyber Center Web site.

 
 
 
This publication is funded in whole or in part through a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this publication (including, without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided). 

January 13, 2017

 
 
 
 
Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice; Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative; Five in 5—Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council

The Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council’s (CICC) Five in 5 is a snapshot of law enforcement and criminal intelligence-related articles, resources, and research that may be of interest to CICC members and partners working to improve the nation’s ability to develop and share criminal intelligence. 

The CICC’s mission—to advocate for and support state, local, and tribal law enforcement and homeland security agencies and personnel in their efforts to develop and share criminal intelligence for the promotion of public safety and the security of our nation—is important, contemporary, and essential.  Five in 5 is provided for your information and awareness as an effort to assist the criminal intelligence community in understanding trends, training, and activities that may impact law enforcement and criminal intelligence.  You are encouraged to share this e-mail with your association members, colleagues, department/organization personnel, and others, as appropriate. Please contact cicc@iir.com to submit an article for consideration in the CICC’s Five in 5.

 
 
     
 
 
1. Human Trafficking

Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch Announces the Justice Department’s National Strategy to Combat Human Trafficking

On January 9, as part of National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch announced the Justice Department’s National Strategy to Combat Human Trafficking (National Strategy), as required by the 2015 Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act.  In addition to this new National Strategy, the Attorney General also submits the Attorney General’s Annual Report to Congress and Assessment of U.S. Government Activities to Combat Trafficking in Persons, which details the programs and activities carried out by all federal agencies and sets forth recommended goals for the upcoming year.  DOJ has also launched www.justice.gov/humantrafficking.  This page will serve as a central destination to learn more about the department’s efforts to combat human trafficking.  Read More

The Fiscal Year 2015 Attorney General’s Annual Report to Congress and Assessment of U.S. Government Activities to Combat Trafficking in Persons is currently available for download.

 
 
     
 
 
2. Law Enforcement

IACP Releases Report Outlining Issues Raised by Law Enforcement Executives

In late August and early September 2016, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) conducted a series of critical issue forums in eight locations throughout the United States.  The purpose of these sessions was to meet with and listen to police executives to gain a better understanding of the distinctive challenges they are facing within their communities and agencies, as well as to discuss and examine the vast array of challenges currently confronting the law enforcement profession as a whole.  Following the listening tour, IACP developed a report to outline the issues raised in the eight forums as well to highlight overarching themes.  Download Resource

 
 
     
 
 
3. Information Sharing

Regional Information Sharing Systems (RISS) Celebrates 20 Years of RISSNET

The Regional Information Sharing Systems is proud to announce that this year marks the 20th anniversary of RISSNET. RISSNET provides access to millions of investigative and intelligence records, connects systems from all levels of government, and helps law enforcement officers securely communicate and connect across jurisdictions.  Hundreds of resources rely on the RISSNET infrastructure to share information.  More than 44 million records are available through these and other RISSNET resources. 

To read the full article regarding RISSNET’s 20th anniversary, access the Fall 2016 RISS Insider.

 
 
     
 
 
4. Technology

Can Alexa Help Solve a Murder?  Police Think So – But Amazon Won’t Give Up Her Data

In November 2016, Bentonville, Arkansas, Police Department officers discovered a decease individual in the backyard of James Bates’ home.  Inside the home, detectives found several smart home devices, otherwise known as Internet of Things (IoT) devices, including an Amazon Echo.  Voice-activated personal command centers such as Amazon Echo or the Google Home are equipped with microphones that respond to a voice command to activate the device.  Police seized the Echo and served a warrant to Amazon, noting in the affidavit there was “reason to believe that Amazon.com is in possession of records related to a homicide investigation being conducted by the Bentonville Police Department.”  While law enforcement have long seized computers, cellphones and other electronics to investigate crimes, this case has raised fresh questions about privacy issues regarding devices like the Amazon Echo or the Google Home, voice-activated personal command centers that are constantly “listening.”  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
5. Cybercrime

Combatting Crime on the Dark Web: How Law Enforcement and Prosecutors are Using Cutting-Edge Technology to Fight Crime

The Prosecutors’ Center for Excellence recently released Combatting Crime on the Dark Web: How Law Enforcement and Prosecutors are Using Cutting-Edge Technology to Fight Crime.  Criminals are increasingly using the internet to mask their identities and conduct illicit activities through the Dark Web, which consists of sites not indexed by search engines, anonymously-hosted, and only accessible with special software and browsers that mask one’s Internet Protocol (IP) address.  Marketplaces on the Dark Web facilitate a range of criminal activities, including human trafficking and the distribution of child pornography.  This resource outlines the difference between different areas of the Web, how prosecutors and law enforcement investigate the Dark Web, and data-mining and the Dark Web.  Download Resource

Additional cyber-related resources are available on the Law Enforcement Cyber Center Web site.

 
 
 
This publication is funded in whole or in part through a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this publication (including, without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided). 

 
 
 
Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice; Global Justice Information Sharing Initiative; Five in 5—Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council

The Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council’s (CICC) Five in 5 is a snapshot of law enforcement and criminal intelligence-related articles, resources, and research that may be of interest to CICC members and partners working to improve the nation’s ability to develop and share criminal intelligence. 

The CICC’s mission—to advocate for and support state, local, and tribal law enforcement and homeland security agencies and personnel in their efforts to develop and share criminal intelligence for the promotion of public safety and the security of our nation—is important, contemporary, and essential.  Five in 5 is provided for your information and awareness as an effort to assist the criminal intelligence community in understanding trends, training, and activities that may impact law enforcement and criminal intelligence.  You are encouraged to share this e-mail with your association members, colleagues, department/organization personnel, and others, as appropriate. Please contact cicc@iir.com to submit an article for consideration in the CICC’s Five in 5.

 
 
     
 
 
1. Community Policing

Community Policing and Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS): Guidelines to Enhance Community Trust

Technology has provided numerous benefits to law enforcement, increasing operational efficiency as well as officer and public safety, and with the growing use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) by law enforcement, these advantages have increased exponentially.  However, operating a UAS safely, without violating privacy and other civil rights, presents great challenges too.  Citizens have expressed concerns over spying, unwanted surveillance, and data collection.  In response, the Police Foundation has developed Community Policing and Unmanned Aircraft Systems: Guidelines to Enhance Community Trust, a one-of-a-kind guidebook to help agencies decide whether to acquire a UAS, and if they do, how to develop policies and procedures which will ensure public support, avoid potential pitfalls, and build community trust. The resource also provides information on UAS training, staffing, policy development, funding, regulations and more - all with a focus on community collaboration and buy-in. 

Download Resource

 
 
     
 
 
2. Drug Threat Assessment

DEA Releases 2016 Drug Threat Assessment: Fentanyl-Related Overdose Deaths Rising at an Alarming Rate

On December 6, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) announced results from the 2016 National Drug Threat Assessment (NDTA), which details the extent to which illicit drugs are affecting the United States.  Most notably, the 2016 NDTA continues to illuminate the nationwide opioid epidemic, which is fueling a growing heroin user population and resulting in a greater amount of overdoses.  This opioid epidemic has been exacerbated by the national reemergence of fentanyl - a synthetic opioid which is much more potent than heroin.  The 2016 NDTA also found that Mexican transnational criminal organizations continue to act as the biggest criminal drug threat to the U.S. and are the primary suppliers of heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine.  View Announcement

Download NDTA Summary

 
 
     
 
 
3. Cybersecurity

Virginia Governor Announces Cybersecurity Training Initiative for Veterans

Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe announced on December 2, a new initiative to give veterans with access to cybersecurity training and skills development.  The Cyber Vets Virginia initiative is part of the state’s effort to help veterans transition back into civilian life.  The program will give veterans the opportunity for cyber education at Virginia community colleges and four-year institutions — as well as information on financial support and career building.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
4. Technology

Artificial Intelligence Toolkit Spots New Child Sexual Abuse Media Online

New artificial intelligence software designed to spot new child sexual abuse media online could help police catch child abusers. The toolkit automatically detects new child sexual abuse photos and videos in online peer-to-peer networks.  The research behind this technology was conducted in the international research project iCOP (Identifying and Catching Originators in P2P Networks), founded by the European Commission Safer Internet Program by researchers at Lancaster University, the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), and University College Cork, Ireland.  There are already a number of tools available to help law enforcement agents monitor peer-to-peer networks for child sexual abuse media, but they usually rely on identifying known media. As a result, these tools are unable to assess the thousands of results they retrieve and can't spot new media that appear.  Read More

 
 
     
 
 
5. Cybercrime

Joint Cyber Operation Takes Down Avalanche Criminal Network

Recently the FBI, alongside law enforcement partners representing 40 countries and with the cooperation of private sector partners, took part in a successful multi-national operation to dismantle the Avalanche Network. Avalanche was a highly secure infrastructure of servers that allegedly offered cyber criminals an unfettered platform from which to conduct malware campaigns and “money mule” money laundering schemes, targeting victims in the U.S. and around the world.  Cyber criminals can victimize millions of users in a moment from anywhere in the world and this takedown highlights the importance of law enforcement and partner coordination internationally against this evolution of organized crime in the virtual world.  Read More

Cyber resources are available at www.iacpcybercenter.org.